The Real Difference Between VC and Crowdfunding? Investment Marketing

A few weeks back the value of VC’s for the crowdfunding industry was extensively discussed. Why? Because there are lot of areas where crowdfunding and VC’s can connect. And though traditional funding and alternative funding are not as rigorously separated as many want to believe, there are some inherit differences that characterise crowdfunding as a different form of funding.

Tanya Prive in 2012 wrote an article on Forbes describing crowdfunding as “the practice of funding a project or venture by raising many small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet.”. Rachel Chalmers refers to as VC money as “fuel for hypergrowth”. In addition, VC’s are in the business of making money for their own investors. Besides the target audience (crowd vs. VC) there doesn’t seem to be clear difference if we look at equity crowdfunding.

In both cases the investor profits financially, entrepreneurs are requested to deliver certain information and investors need to be convinced. Then why worry about the differences? Because, despite being marketed as the go-to Holy Grail of funding, most crowdfunding campaigns fail, only 1 in 10 succeeds on IndieGoGo (according to The Verge’s great article). And not because they were all bad investment opportunities. The problem was marketing.

Timing of the money

A first, very well visualised differenced can be found via Startup Guide: the timing. As you’ll see the type of funding for each phase varies a lot. Of course there’s some overlap but in general, VC’s won’t invest in anything that isn’t creating revenue yet. Crowdfunding on the other hand, has the reputation to be solely for start-ups. In my everyday job as Symbid‘s proposition manager where I coach the entrepreneurs in their funding, I see very different companies.

Small companies that have been in existence for quite a time (between 5-25 years); film funds that have a million dollar budget but want to do some form of inspiring marketing; individual entrepreneurs who still have to write down their business plan; growing start-ups that come back every year for another round and companies want fast forward their growth, using the money for “hypergrowth”.

Because crowdfunding lets the entrepreneur be in control of their own funding trajectory, it can be used any time they feel the time is right. Of course there are some exceptions (if you have no time for it, then don’t do it), but it is the entrepreneur that is fully responsible for the how and when of the funding process.

The reputation and differences in outcome

Crowdfunding was the first aid kit for capital when no one else will give you money. Crowdfunding is a necessary evil, having a VC is a luxury. But is that true?

Chalmers gives five very compelling reasons why you’d want to stay away from Venture Capitalists as an entrepreneur. In summary, a loss of control and narrowing down business development options. The idea that most successful companies raise money via a VC is a urban legend in Entrepreneurship Town; lots of companies succeed without that money.

Again, via crowdfunding the entrepreneur stays in control for the most part. Though a good VC investment can bring lots of good for a company, the company is a product that the VC needs to make money in. While in crowdfunding, there’s a sense of togetherness, sharing and support backed by money. Different ways of funding your company that have different results and different outcomes for you company. And with all the sustainable, social and consumers as “fans”, one might start to think equity crowdfunding is starting to become the epitome of involving your customer.

Self regulated fund raising as a basis for the process & dynamics

Entrepreneurs prepare a campaign when starting with crowdfunding, instead of a single pitch that appeals to all VC’s alike. This also means “one at a time” vs. a full blown marketing crusade: that’s a VC funding quest vs. a crowdfunding process. Whereas getting the right network and subscriptions to VC-networks gets the entrepreneur one appointment at a time, crowdfunding requires to think about ways to reach your audiences and target markets as successfully as possible.

Questions like: what am I selling to whom, who is my target audience, is my own network a seperate group, is there a difference between my customers and investors, where are they, how should I address them, should we send out a press release, and so forth are not at all uncommon during crowdfunding. Whereas a entrepreneur wouldn’t send out a press release about his appointment with a VC, nor would he continuously (almost obsessively) update his network about the progress.

Though the information used as a basis of communication (business plan, financial projections, etc.) is often the same, the ideas and literal message are very different. If an entrepreneur decides to root for VC, their business will be tailored for a specific payback. In crowdfunding, the campaign in itself, a small ROI and the opportunity to make something possible, are the expected outcomes.

Instead convincing the VC’s the entrepreneur engages; instead of saying “your investment makes ABC possible” and entrepreneur has to focus on “together we can..”; instead of talking to a superior or someone the entrepreneur is dependent on, they’ll talk to their peers. Crowdfunding is weeks of continued marketing efforts in order to gather funds bit by bit, while VC money are intermittent,  singular conversations that aim to get a large amount of money at once. These differences highlight the difference between the characterizing dynamics for each type of funding.

Investment marketing

In short, whereas VC’s money is hauled in by “closing the deal” and single selling moments, crowdfunding really is investment marketing. If we look at the dynamics during the campaign I could swap “the company” for any other product and it wouldn’t be called “crowdfunding” but “marketing”. Analysing and setting up various campaigns, the 4 (or 7) P’s are a great way to make entrepreneurs think about what they’re selling and how they’re attracting enough customers, emphasizing the strong marketing dynamics that really separate crowdfunding from VC funding raising.

Zoek je investeerders? Denk eens aan Investment Marketing!

Volgens onderzoeksbureau Panteia zijn er in 2013 zo’n 17.000 ondernemers bij gekomen, een stijging van 13% ten opzichte van 2012. De vraag is alleen, hoe komen al deze ondernemers aan kapitaal?

Nederland heeft de afgelopen jaren aan het leningeninfuus gelegen en is het overgrote deel van de MKB- financieringstrajecten is niet ingericht op een andere vorm van kapitaalverschaffing dan leningen of subsidies. Toch neigt het financieringsbestel steeds meer naar een “doe-het-zelf”-financieringsmethode. Maar hoe financiert een onderneming zichzelf? Venture Capitalists en Angels zijn vaak moeilijk te bereiken, crowdfunding is voor sommigen nog te riskant. Bij geen van de methoden is succes gegarandeerd. Toch zijn er een aantal manieren om de kans op financiering, bij welke vorm van financiering dan ook, te vergroten. Eén van die manieren is Investment Marketing.

Wat is het?

Investment Marketing omhelst de visie, strategie, tactieken en acties die worden ondernomen om de kans op financiering te vergroten. Investment Marketing richt zich erop de verkoopbaarheid en aantrekkelijkheid van een bedrijf te vergroten en af te stemmen op de kapitaalverschaffers. Dit omvat meer dan alleen het “pitch ready” krijgen van een onderneming of businessplan, of het ontwikkelen van een kapitaalvraag. Denk hierbij aan het inrichten van communicatiekanalen voor investeerders, artikelen en interviews te publiceren die de financierbaarheid van het bedrijf op boeiende wijze verwoorden, het kwantificeren van zaken zoals good will en merkbeleid, enzovoorts. Dit moet allemaal worden afstemt op de financierder.

Nóg een vorm van marketing? Waarom?

Trendy “alles-moet-2.0”- termen zijn niet aan mij besteed en ik geloof niet in hippe marketinggoeroes die beroemd worden met e-books. Er zijn al veel verschillende typen marketing en het is goed om je af te vragen of er nou nog een bij moet komen. Het antwoord is ja.

Normaal gesproken duurt een kapitaalaanvraag tussen de 3 en 18 maanden. Via crowdfunding kan dit veelal worden gereduceerd tot zo’n 3 maanden (langer dan dat wil je er niet over doen). Binnen een periode van ongeveer 3 maanden weet je of je pitch zal slagen of niet. Toch zijn er bedrijven geweest die ondanks een goed businessplan er niet in slaagden het beoogde kapitaal aan te trekken. En dat is zonde, want met een goed marketingplan kan een ondernemer de kans op financiering vele malen groter maken en de duur van een kapitaalaanvraag minimaliseren. Dit geldt ook voor crowdfunding.

Investment Marketing kan worden ingezet voor alle vormen van financiering, niet alleen crowdfunding, en er zijn verschillende redenen om een specialisatie in het marketinggebied aan te brengen die zich richt op de financierbaarheid van bedrijven.

Ten eerste zijn veel ondernemers niet gewend hun bedrijf te verkopen, ze zijn gewend hun product te verkopen. Daar is niets mis mee, maar in de praktijk zie ik vaak ondernemers die proberen hun speelgoedknuffels te verkopen aan bankmedewerkers of VC’s.

De doelgroep is dus beduidend anders. Een speelgoed verkoper probeert de kinderen warm te maken voor het product, maar de ouders aan te zetten tot aanschaf van het product. Er wordt onderscheidt gemaakt op basis van tone-of-voice en kanaal. Als speelgoedproduct zal je je investeerders ook niet kunnen interesseren met een Intertoysblad of rond de Sinterklaas- of Kerstperiode. Kortom, investeerders zijn een andere doelgroep een daarbij horen een ander product, andere kanalen, andere boodschap, andere informatie en andere strategie.

Maar wat verkoop je dan wel?

Je verkoopt je bedrijf, jezelf en de meerwaarde die jullie samen creëren. In sommige gevallen is de ondernemer het bedrijf, in andere gevallen is het bedrijf al wat groter en is er ook veel kennis, tone of voice en “financierbaarheid” aanwezig in zowel concrete (pand, auto’s, contracten, geld) als in abstracte zin (impliciete kennis, houding van de medewerkers ten opzichte van klanten, good will, merkidentiteit- en waarde).

De investeerder koopt een deel van je bedrijf en zal dus kijken naar het financiële plaatje (cash flow, winst- en verliesrekening, de verwachtingen en de te maken investering, etc.), het ‘contract’ dat je hem voorlegt (aandeelhoudersovereenkomst), de overall waardering (bedrijfswaardering), de marktontwikkelingen, de ondernemer en het team, maar ook naar de andere investeerders als je die al hebt.

Conclusie

Kortom, om al deze aspecten helder en aantrekkelijk geformuleerd voor te kunnen leggen aan een investeerder, moet je als ondernemer weten wat een investeerder wil, welke andere investeringen een geldschieter nog meer overweegt (wie zijn je concurrenten), hoe je investeerders bereikt en hoe je op zo’n manier je bedrijfsvoering- en marketing inricht dat deze aantrekkelijk zijn voor een investeerder. Dat doe je niet met één pitch, maar met een gericht marketingbeleid gericht op mogelijke financiers. Reden genoeg om van investeerders een aparte doelgroep te maken binnen het marketingbeleid van jouw bedrijf!

Top 19 crowdfunding experts startups needs to know

Crowdfunding has grown to become a very large part of startups success plan. Many companies are launching their businesses on sites like Kickstarter, Indigogo as well as several other sites to give their business a social proof. I’ve organized a list of some of the top experts from around the world to help you get the best advice possible when it comes to crowdfunding. The following is our list of the top 19 crowdfunding experts we used inPowered for the data:

Samantha Hurst

Samantha Hurst is presently a staff writer with Crowdfund Insider. She works alongside crowdfunding experts and lawyers to get the most recent news on the latest campaigns, platforms, and press releases. In the past, she has worked in numerous industries which include social media, engineering, entertainment media, and event planning.

Michael Ibberson

Michael Ibberson is an expert writer from Toronto, Ontario, who specializes in press releases, blogs and newsletters. He contributes to Crowdfunding–education/strategy, campaign promotion, and campaign management.

Kamni Gupta

Kamni is a lover of knowledge, a strategist and a leader. She is a self-proclaimed start-up junkie, with more than six years of expertise working with various early phase start-ups, the latest being CrowdFoundme, CoFoundersLab, and TheM2Group.

Erin Hobey

Hobey writes and researches original copy which covers international and domestic crowdfunding campaigns, which include Atlas Wearables, AngelPad, BoatSetter, and Boatbound, just to name a few.

Robert Hoskins

Hoskins is a Fortune 500 Corporate communications leader who has been fortunate enough to appreciate a long corporate communications career which has involved planning marketing campaigns for known brands and firms, which include: American Airlines, Halliburton, Rockwell International, Bell Helicopter, Texas Instruments, MCI, Sprint, etc.

Catherine Clifford

In the ten years that she has been a journalist, she has worked with The New York Daily News, CNNMoney.com, CNN, and Entrepreneur.com. She has intentionally driven her path in journalism toward the topics which excite her. Clifford’s latest work covers crowdfunding and social entrepreneurship and, according to her, has been the most rewarding of her career.

Aaron Djekic

CEO and founder of CrowdClan, Aaron Djekic, previously spent almost ten years helping startup businesses that needed capital to launch their companies. Djekic has designed the Beta version of CrowdClan, amongst the most successful and reputable crowdfunding resources out there today.

Bill Huston

According to statistics, 60 percent of crowdfunding campaigns never become completely funded. At My Crowd Rocks they think the reason is simple. Crowdfunding includes a compound term and if you do not build an excited and engaged crowd you won’t get the funding desired.

Darryl Burma

Burma is a crowdfunding industry thought leader and forward thinker. For the last couple of years he has been highly involved within the crowdfunding field and is the CEO and Co-founder at CrowdMapped.com, the globe’s first 411 search directory and global geo-location based crowdfunding company.

Fritz Parker

Parker researched, wrote, and managed blog content to spotlight the work of the crowdfunding industry and Launcht, which includes industry developments and trends.

Ludwine Dekker
Dekker is the senior contributor for CrowdfundInsider. Dekker has been coaching entrepreneurs and executing their fund raising for 3 years. As a digital marketing expert, Dekker specializes in entrepreneurship, fund-raising, and technology. As a Symbid campaign manager, Dekker strategically manages the entrepreneur’s requirements and campaigns, frequently writes for many platforms, organizes pitch events, as well as gives workshops

Paula Newton

Another crowdfunding expert. She writes comprehensive guides on how and what to do for every crowdfunding situation.

Kendall Almerico

Crowdfunding expert, attorney, as well as JOBS Act Expert named within January of 2014, by VentureBeat, as the seventeenth Most Influential Leader Within The Crowdfunding Industry.

Simon Dixon

Dixon is an active banking reformer as well as director of the United Kingdom Digital Currency Association and founding member of the United Kingdom CrowdFunding Assoc., who consistently speaks about the future of finance to financial institutions, investors, businesses, and governments.

Clyde Smith

Hypebot Sr. Contributor Clyde Smith blogs of music crowdfunding at Crowdfunding For Musicians.

Devin Thorpe

Thorpe’s books on crowdfunding and personal finance draw on his entrepreneurial finance expertise as a CFO, an investment banker, mortgage broker, and treasurer, assisting individuals utilize financial sources to do good.

Chance Barnett

Barnett is the CEO of crowdfunder.com. He democratizes early phase investment for entrepreneurs via the power of the JOBS Act and equity crowdfunding.

Vann Alexandra Daly

Vann Alexandra includes a creative services agency which gets projects financed via crowdfunding. In the last 2 years, the business has produced multiple crowdfunding campaigns-with a 100 percent success rate-and raised millions of dollars for customers who include Neil Young, critically acclaimed journalists, and Emmy and Oscar nominated filmmakers.

Carolyn M. Brown

Brown is Sr. Producer at Black Enterprise, and is responsible for the editorial direction of content about franchising, entrepreneurship, small business financing, and entertainment around multimedia platforms–live events, broadcast, digital and print.

(Originally published on Inc.com).

Zoek je investeerders? Denk eens aan Investment Marketing!

Volgens onderzoeksbureau Panteia zijn er in 2013 zo’n 17.000 ondernemers bij gekomen, een stijging van 13% ten opzichte van 2012. De vraag is alleen, hoe komen al deze ondernemers aan kapitaal?

Nederland heeft de afgelopen jaren aan het leningeninfuus gelegen en is het overgrote deel van de MKB- financieringstrajecten is niet ingericht op een andere vorm van kapitaalverschaffing dan leningen of subsidies. Toch neigt het financieringsbestel steeds meer naar een “doe-het-zelf”-financieringsmethode. Maar hoe financiert een onderneming zichzelf? Venture Capitalists en Angels zijn vaak moeilijk te bereiken, crowdfunding is voor sommigen nog te riskant. Bij geen van de methoden is succes gegarandeerd. Toch zijn er een aantal manieren om de kans op financiering, bij welke vorm van financiering dan ook, te vergroten. Eén van die manieren is Investment Marketing.

Wat is het?

Investment Marketing omhelst de visie, strategie, tactieken en acties die worden ondernomen om de kans op financiering te vergroten. Investment Marketing richt zich erop de verkoopbaarheid en aantrekkelijkheid van een bedrijf te vergroten en af te stemmen op de kapitaalverschaffers. Dit omvat meer dan alleen het “pitch ready” krijgen van een onderneming of businessplan, of het ontwikkelen van een kapitaalvraag. Denk hierbij aan het inrichten van communicatiekanalen voor investeerders, artikelen en interviews te publiceren die de financierbaarheid van het bedrijf op boeiende wijze verwoorden, het kwantificeren van zaken zoals good will en merkbeleid, enzovoorts. Dit moet allemaal worden afstemt op de financierder.

Nóg een vorm van marketing? Waarom?

Trendy “alles-moet-2.0”- termen zijn niet aan mij besteed en ik geloof niet in hippe marketinggoeroes die beroemd worden met e-books. Er zijn al veel verschillende typen marketing en het is goed om je af te vragen of er nou nog een bij moet komen. Het antwoord is ja.

Normaal gesproken duurt een kapitaalaanvraag tussen de 3 en 18 maanden. Via crowdfunding kan dit veelal worden gereduceerd tot zo’n 3 maanden (langer dan dat wil je er niet over doen). Binnen een periode van ongeveer 3 maanden weet je of je pitch zal slagen of niet. Toch zijn er bedrijven geweest die ondanks een goed businessplan er niet in slaagden het beoogde kapitaal aan te trekken. En dat is zonde, want met een goed marketingplan kan een ondernemer de kans op financiering vele malen groter maken en de duur van een kapitaalaanvraag minimaliseren. Dit geldt ook voor crowdfunding.

Investment Marketing kan worden ingezet voor alle vormen van financiering, niet alleen crowdfunding, en er zijn verschillende redenen om een specialisatie in het marketinggebied aan te brengen die zich richt op de financierbaarheid van bedrijven.

Ten eerste zijn veel ondernemers niet gewend hun bedrijf te verkopen, ze zijn gewend hun product te verkopen. Daar is niets mis mee, maar in de praktijk zie ik vaak ondernemers die proberen hun speelgoedknuffels te verkopen aan bankmedewerkers of VC’s.

De doelgroep is dus beduidend anders. Een speelgoed verkoper probeert de kinderen warm te maken voor het product, maar de ouders aan te zetten tot aanschaf van het product. Er wordt onderscheidt gemaakt op basis van tone-of-voice en kanaal. Als speelgoedproduct zal je je investeerders ook niet kunnen interesseren met een Intertoysblad of rond de Sinterklaas- of Kerstperiode. Kortom, investeerders zijn een andere doelgroep een daarbij horen een ander product, andere kanalen, andere boodschap, andere informatie en andere strategie.

Maar wat verkoop je dan wel?

Je verkoopt je bedrijf, jezelf en de meerwaarde die jullie samen creëren. In sommige gevallen is de ondernemer het bedrijf, in andere gevallen is het bedrijf al wat groter en is er ook veel kennis, tone of voice en “financierbaarheid” aanwezig in zowel concrete (pand, auto’s, contracten, geld) als in abstracte zin (impliciete kennis, houding van de medewerkers ten opzichte van klanten, good will, merkidentiteit- en waarde).

De investeerder koopt een deel van je bedrijf en zal dus kijken naar het financiële plaatje (cash flow, winst- en verliesrekening, de verwachtingen en de te maken investering, etc.), het ‘contract’ dat je hem voorlegt (aandeelhoudersovereenkomst), de overall waardering (bedrijfswaardering), de marktontwikkelingen, de ondernemer en het team, maar ook naar de andere investeerders als je die al hebt.

Conclusie

Kortom, om al deze aspecten helder en aantrekkelijk geformuleerd voor te kunnen leggen aan een investeerder, moet je als ondernemer weten wat een investeerder wil, welke andere investeringen een geldschieter nog meer overweegt (wie zijn je concurrenten), hoe je investeerders bereikt en hoe je op zo’n manier je bedrijfsvoering- en marketing inricht dat deze aantrekkelijk zijn voor een investeerder. Dat doe je niet met één pitch, maar met een gericht marketingbeleid gericht op mogelijke financiers. Reden genoeg om van investeerders een aparte doelgroep te maken binnen het marketingbeleid van jouw bedrijf!